University of California, Riverside

UCR Study Abroad - UCR Summer Abroad Program




2014 Rome, Italy



Rome: The Eternal City

“What is all history other than the praise of Rome?” – Petrarch

  • General Program Information

    Rome offers undergraduate students a unique opportunity to study ancient history, literature, archaeology and art at first hand. By studying and visiting archaeological sites and museums, students can see the complexity, originality and contribution of the Romans through the physical remains of its culture. The city of Rome, the largest in the ancient Mediterranean world, was a multifaceted urban setting, the remains of which have influenced writers, thinkers, artists, architects and historians for centuries. The courses proposed take advantage of the city to excite students as they engage with the Roman past.

    Professor:
    Michele R. Salzman, History

    Host Institution:
    American University in Rome
    Rome, Italy

    Courses:
    HISE 110 (Ancient Historians; 4 units)
    HIST 190 (Group Directed Study/Rome: The Eternal City; 4 units)

    Dates:
    June 30-July 26, 2014
    Note that this is a 5-week Summer Session I course, and will require some academic work prior to departure.

  • Accommodations in Italy

    The American University of Rome (AUR) is one of the oldest degree-granting American universities in Italy. Students obtain an accredited United States of America bachelor degree upon completion of the academic program (typically four years in duration.) The US bachelor’s degree is universally recognized as a standard of success of higher education.

    AUR uses Rome as its classroom and Italy and Europe as invaluable resources. The American University of Rome prepares students to live and work across cultures through its practical interdisciplinary academic majors, opportunities for learning through travel and internships, and its multi-cultural faculty and staff.  

    Resources:

    Since 1969 AUR has had a tradition of pairing intellectual rigour with the unique opportunity to use Rome as its classroom. Its tradition of creativity and entrepreneurship owes a great deal to its exceptional location in the Eternal City.

    The American University of Rome Housing takes great pride in providing students with safe, comfortable living environments.  All students opting for university housing are provided with fully furnished apartments in areas surrounding the campus for a “full immersion” cultural experience.  Each apartment is typically shared by 5 or 6 students and includes the following amenities: PC computer, Wi-Fi, land-line phone, linens, towels, washing machine and a fully equipped Kitchen.

  • Detailed Program Fees

    Program Fees

    Program-Related FeesUndergraduates Graduates 
    Non-refundable application fee/deposit $300.00 Same as undergraduate
    2nd Deposit $700.00 Same as undergraduate
    Course fees – 8 units $2,200.04 $2,699.58
    Remaining Program Fees – Accommodations, transportation, excursions $1,688.00 Same as undergraduate
    Estimated Additional CostsUndergraduates Graduates 
    Estimated Meal and Personal Costs $800.00 Same as undergraduate
    Estimated Pre-Departure Expenses (Photos, Passports, etc.) $500.00 Same as undergraduate
    Estimated Round-Trip Airfare $1,800.00 Same as undergraduate
  • Courses & Syllabus

    Courses:

    HISE 110 (Ancient Historians; 4 units)

    The course traces the growth of the city of Rome through its monuments, art, architecture, and literary remains.  Teaching this course in Rome is ideal, for we have direct access to the monuments and topography of the city, as well as its material culture.   The course is organized chronologically, beginning in the archaic period in the Roman Forum and on the Palatine Hill. It proceeds in week two to visit the victory temples and houses of the late Republic and early Augustan Age. In week three we study imperial Rome, with planned visits to the Forums of Augustus and Trajan, and the Pantheon. We also consider the entertainment venues that were part of imperial Rome, notably the Colosseum and Circus Maximus. We conclude in the fourth century with the monuments, Christian basilicas, and urban redevelopment of the city completed by the now Christian emperor Constantine.

    By studying the changing topography of Rome, students can appreciate the historical as well as material contribution made by Roman civilization.  Guest lecturers by archaeologists will allow us to see the most recent discoveries that have come to light in Rome this year. Visits to sites will offer students the chance to see archaeologists at work and to get behind the scenes on-going excavations.  

    As to formal requirements, students will be required to present one oral reports (one per student) on a site or monument that we are visiting. After they get feedback on their presentations, the students will turn their site reports into a term paper (5-7 pages).  A final exam will allow students to synthesize the major changes in Rome’s urban history. Research for the site reports can be carried out in Rome at the American Academy Library and at the library of the American University, both on the Janiculum Hill in Rome, as well as through the use of a variety of on-line digital databases and using the assigned readings.

    HIST 190 (Group Directed Study/Rome: The Eternal City; 4 units)

    This course considers the idea of history as it developed in ancient historical writings from the ancient Near East through the Mediterranean period. Because we are in Rome, we will focus on the writers of the Roman world, with special attention to the narrative histories of the Romans. These will include the Histories of Livy, Tacitus, and Ammianus Marcellinus. The class will meet in seminars to discuss the contribution of these texts to the historical development of historiography, and its relationship to modern historical thought. We will have weekly visits to relevant museums and archives to consider the material evidence – inscriptions, coins, calendars, documents – that ancient historians used to write history.

    Students will be asked to keep a journal as they develop their understanding of the principal historians we discuss. Weekly journal entries (one-two pages) will be turned in.  Using these, and in conjunction with myself and the teaching assistant, students will write a 7-10 page term paper that discusses the origins, development and contribution of their chosen historian to the development of history or its contribution to modern historical thought.

    History Courses offered: Both courses fulfill upper division requirements for History majors and general education requirements. No prerequisites required.

    HIST 190 (Group Directed Study/Rome: The Eternal City; 4 credits):

    This course traces the city of Rome from its beginning down through the reign of Constantine through its monuments, art, architecture, and textual remains.

    Rome: The Eternal City

    The city of Rome was the center of a world Empire. Its development, urban systems and architecture were models for cities and empires for centuries to come. Indeed, long after the empire had fallen, the city that was built and inhabited by emperors inspired writers, poets and artists. This course traces the development of the city of ancient Rome from its origins down through the reign of Constantine, the first Christian emperor   By studying the literary and historical evidence in the light of the physical remains of the city -- its monuments, art historical and archaeological remains-- this course seeks to introduce students to the Romans and to the importance which this empire had for the civilizations of the Mediterranean world. The course focuses on Rome, but it will also look at the cultures that influenced the Romans most directly, notably the Etruscans and Greeks.

    Students will visit the most important ancient cites in Rome, including the Colosseum, the Roman Forum, the Imperial For a, the Pantheon, and Circus Maximus. We will have a day trip to the port city of Rome, Ostia, and a weekend trip to study the Roman city of Pompeii.

    Required Texts:

    • Peter J. Aicher, Rome Alive. A Source-Guide to the Ancient City. Volume 1 (Bolzachy-Carducci Publishers, Illinois).
    • Amanda Claridge, Rome: An Oxford Archaeological Guide (Oxford and New York: Oxford Univ. Press).
    • John Stambaugh, The Ancient Roman City (Baltimore and London: John Hopkins Univ. Press).
    • Suetonius, Lives of the Caesars (Penguin)

    Course Materials: Selections from ancient texts and modern scholarship available on UCR I learn.edu (= Ilearn in the syllabus).

    Week 1. Early Rome: From the City of Romulus to the Mid-Republic.
    Site visits: The Roman Forum, The Palatine Hill.
    Readings from Aicher, Claridge, Stambaugh.

    Week 2.   The End of the Republic and the Augustan Principate
    Site visits: Forum of Caesar, Basilica Aemilia, Temple of Deified Julius Caesar; Forum of Augustus; Palatine House of Augustus, House of Livia, Temple of Apollo on the Palatine Hill, The Campus Martius and Altar of Peace.
    Readings from Aicher, Claridge, Stambaugh. Suetonius Life of Caesar and Life of Augustus.

    Week 3. Life in Imperial Rome from Nero through the age of Trajan
    Site visits: Nero’s Golden House, the Palatine Palaces, Colosseum, Arch of Titus, Forum of Peace, Circus Maximus, The Forum of Trajan,
    Readings from Aicher, Claridge, Stambagh,; Suetonius’ Life of Nero, Life of Vespasian.

    Week 4. The Romans and their Gods: From Hadrian and the Pantheon through Constantine.
    Site visits: Temple of Venus and Rome, The Pantheon, Temple of Matidia, Mithraeum from St. Clemente; The Arch of Constantine, St. John the Lateran Basilica.
    Reading: Selections from The Lives of the Later Caesar’s for Hadrian, Eusebius’ Life of Constantine, on Ilearn).

    Requirements:
    There is an oral report (10 minutes) on a site or monument that we will visit. That site or monument will be the subject of one short paper (6-7 pages, typed, double spaced). The report will be developed in consultation with Professor Salzman. Students will be asked to maintain journals that will be collected on a weekly basis. There will be a final exam.

    Your grade will be based on the following:

    • Oral Report                                                                            10 %
    • Short paper on a site or monument (6-7 pages)            25%
    • Journal                                                                                    20 %
    • Attendance and Participation                                              15 %
    • Final exam                                                                              30 %

    HISE 110 (Ancient Historians; 4 credits):

    This course second considers the idea of history as it developed in ancient historical writings from the ancient Near East through the Mediterranean period. Because we are in Rome, we will focus on the writers of the Roman world, with special attention to the narrative histories of the Romans, namely Livy, Tacitus, and Ammianus Marcellinus. The class will meet in seminars to discuss the contribution of these texts to the historical development of historiography, and its relationship to modern historical thought. We will have weekly visits to relevant museums and archives to consider the material evidence – inscriptions, coins, calendars, documents – that ancient historians used to write history.

    Students will be asked to keep a journal as they develop their understanding of the principal historians we discuss. Weekly journal entries (one-two pages) will be turned in.   Using these, and in conjunction with myself and the teaching assistant, students will write a 7-10 page term paper that discusses the origins, development and contribution of their chosen historian to the development of history or its contribution to modern historical thought.

    Required Texts:

    • Selections from Herodotus, Histories and Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War
    • Livy, Histories Books 1-5
    • Tacitus, Annals
    • Ammianus Marcellinus, Histories
  • Tentative Program Itinerary

    The program includes regular visits to museums and archaeological sites of importance for the two courses (History 190 and History of Europe 111), and also for understanding Rome and Roman history and culture.  In addition to formal, classroom-style lectures on key themes in the two courses which will be offered at the American University in Rome, we will take regular trips to sites and monuments in Rome and in nearby Ostia, the port city of Rome. When on site, students will hear short talks offered by Professor Salzman and local specialists on key monuments and artifacts. Students will deliver their oral reports on a key monument or site based on some aspect of the site or museum; the topic will be selected in advance and in consultation with Professor Salzman and the student’s interests.

    For both courses, weekly 'discussion sections' led by the TA at historical and archaeological sites visited by the program will focus on the relationship between ancient literary sources for a given site/event (to be distributed and read in advance by students) and the material record at hand.

    Included in the program is a three day visit to historic Pompeii, allowing for direct, physical engagement with one of the largest extant cities from the Roman world. Pompeii and Herculaneum, the two major cities destroyed by the eruption of Mt Vesuvius and preserved by layers of ash, allow us to confront a Roman city at first hand. The visit includes two days of on-site walking and lectures from local excavators, as well as a visit to the Naples Archaeological Museum which houses most of the extant finds from these excavated cities.

    In Rome and on the road, students will be given free time for personal exploration and reflection at each site/museum, which they will document in their journals. While on the road, breakfast will be offered at each hotel; students may purchase supplies for the next day's lunch on the night before, and there will be dinner options in the town of Pompeii.

    Tentative Agenda:

    Week 1 - Early Rome: From the City of Romulus to the Mid-Republic
    Site visits: The Roman Forum, The Palatine Hill.
    Readings from Aicher, Claridge, Stambaugh.

    Week 2 - The End of the Republic and the Augustan Principate
    Site visits: Forum of Caesar, Basilica Aemilia, Temple of Deified Julius Caesar; Forum of Augustus; Palatine House of Augustus, House of Livia, Temple of Apollo on the Palatine Hill, The Campus Martius and Altar of Peace.
    Readings from Aicher, Claridge, Stambaugh. Suetonius Life of Caesar and Life of Augustus.

    Week 3 - Life in Imperial Rome from Nero through the age of Trajan
    Site visits: Nero’s Golden House, the Palatine Palaces, Colosseum, Arch of Titus, Forum of Peace, Circus Maximus, The Forum of Trajan.
    Readings from Aicher, Claridge, Stambagh,; Suetonius’ Life of Nero, Life of Vespasian.

    Week 4 - The Romans and their Gods: From Hadrian and the Pantheon through Constantine
    Site visits: Temple of Venus and Rome, The Pantheon, Temple of Matidia, Mithraeum from St. Clemente; The Arch of Constantine, St. John the Lateran Basilica.
    Reading: Selections from The Lives of the Later Caesar’s for Hadrian, Eusebius’ Life of Constantine, on Ilearn).

  • Faculty Letter

    Rome: The Eternal City
    Join Dr. Salzman in Rome, Italy this summer!


    Dear Prospective Student:

    I am pleased to offer you the possibility of studying in Rome, Italy this summer. This is a unique opportunity to gain first hand acquaintance with the ever changing, city of Rome, and the largest in the ancient Mediterranean world. Living and studying in this multifaceted urban setting will allow you to understand the physical and textual remains that lie at the heart of western civilization, and which have inspired writers, thinkers, artists, architects and historians until today.

    In Rome, we will be meeting in classrooms and using the facilities (i.e. library, computing center, etc.) at the American University in Rome on the Janiculum Hill in Rome. The American University also will provide student apartments in the campus vicinity, no more than a 30 minutes bus ride from their classroom and center on the Janiculum. All apartments have 5 to 6 beds, generally 3 double rooms, 1 fully equipped kitchen, a living room, and two restrooms. They also have Internet connection, wifi and television. For a full description of the housing services please see their web site at this page.

    Typically, we will meet for classes, lectures, and discussion sections on M, W and Friday mornings. Tuesdays and Thursdays are reserved for site visits and excursions to major museums in Rome and Ostia. There is sufficient unstructured time for visits to the numerous other sites and cities near Rome. Weekend excursions to nearby Italian cities and cites, such as Florence, Orvieto, Capri, Sperlonga, are possible due to Italy’s excellent and relatively inexpensive train system.  We will provide information about flight arrangements, cell phone service, exchanging dollars for Euros, and health insurance once you have enrolled. Most students use Skype to be in contact with friends and family.

    I am happy to respond to any questions you may have.   You can reach me at Michele.salzman@ucr.edu or by phone, 951 827 1991. Your main source of information about the necessary steps to be taken to enroll in this program is the Summer Study Abroad e-mail address (SSAbroad@ucr.edu). An information session will be announced soon on the web page.

    I have taken students abroad before, and welcome the opportunity to introduce you to ancient Rome and modern Italy. Space is limited. We can accommodate no more than twenty-five participants, so please decide about your participation as soon as you can.

    I look forward to speaking with you in person at UCR and in Rome!

    Michele Renee Salzman

    University of California Presidential Chair, 2009-2012

    Chair, Tri-Campus Classical Studies Executive Committee

    Department of History
    6603 HMNSS Bldg.

    University of California, Riverside 92521
    (951) 827 - 1991

  • Pre-departure Orientation



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University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

Contact Information

Education Abroad
0321 Surge Building

Tel: (951) 827-4113
E-mail: educationabroad@ucr.edu

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